Science & Technology

FILE - In this 2009 photo, Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command members, right, work with South Korean soldiers in searching for U.S. soldiers' remains.

US Advances in Identifying Korean War Vets’ Remains

DNA testing of victims remains and relatives speeds up content analysis of 208 boxes Pyongyang handed over to US in early 1990s More

Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists

University of Southern California Annenberg School of Journalism in Los Angeles is teaching next generation of journalists with help of state-of-the-art newsroom More

Researchers use a non-invasive procedure called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to jumpstart a region of the brain that’s involved in forming memories.

Electric Current May Boost Memory in People with Cognitive Disorders

A mild electrical current through the skull can strengthen communication among brain cells involved in memory More

The leaf on the Apple symbol is tinted green at the Apple flagship store, 5th Avenue, New York, April 22, 2014.

Apple Announces September 9 Product Launch

Rumors surrounding Apple's upcoming iPhone6 continue to swirl More

FILE - A man drinking coffee.

Scientists: Coffee and Naps - the Best Combination

Experiments suggests that coffee and naps taken together maximize brain’s alertness More


More Science & Technology News

California Drought Attracts Dowsers

Dowsing consists of scanning ground holding a Y or L-shaped twig or rod, or even a pendulum
More

Scientists Use Mutations to Track Ebola Origins

Researchers say new findings will help create accurate diagnostic tests for Ebola
More

Scientists Grow First Functional Replacement Organ

Thymus, located next to heart, serves as immune system's command center
More

Locust Swarms Fill Antananarivo Skies

FAO-led control efforts halted plague
More

Gene Studies of Ebola in Sierra Leone Show Virus Mutating Fast

Hundreds of changes could blunt effectiveness of diagnostic tests and experimental treatments now in development
More

Video Asian Bacteria Threatens Florida Orange Trees

Widespread infestation by Asian insect called psyllid again highlights danger of transferring non-native species to American soil officials say
More

NASA: New Heavy-Lift Rocket Likely for 2018 Debut

NASA estimates it could spend almost $12 billion developing initial rocket, and potentially billions more to build and fly heavier-lift next-generation boosters
More

Paleontologists Analyze Possible Dinosaur Nest, Young ‘Babysitter’

Some dinosaurs may have operated nurseries for their hatchlings, according to new study
More
More Articles

Video

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalistsi
X
Elizabeth Lee
September 01, 2014 3:52 PM
The Internet and rapidly evolving technology is quickly changing how people receive news and how journalists deliver it. There are now more ways to tell a story than ever before. One school in Los Angeles is teaching the next generation of journalists with the help of a state-of-the-art newsroom. Elizabeth Lee has this report.
Video

Video Internet, Technology Offer New Tools for Journalists

The Internet and rapidly evolving technology is quickly changing how people receive news and how journalists deliver it. There are now more ways to tell a story than ever before. One school in Los Angeles is teaching the next generation of journalists with the help of a state-of-the-art newsroom. Elizabeth Lee has this report.
Video

Video Asian Bacteria Threatens Florida Orange Trees

Florida's citrus fruit industry is facing a serious threat from a bacteria carried by the Asian insect called psyllid. The widespread infestation again highlights the danger of transferring non-native species to American soil. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Chinese Doctors Use 3-D Spinal Implant

A Chinese boy suffering from a debilitating bone disease has become the first patient with a part of his spine created in a three-dimensional printer. Doctors say he will soon regain normal mobility. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Rubber May Soon Come From Dandelions

Synthetic rubber has been around for more than a century, but quality tires for cars, trucks and aircraft still need up to 40 percent or more natural rubber content. As the source of natural rubber, the rubber tree, is prone to disease and can be affected by bad weather. So scientists are looking for replacements. And as VOA’s George Putic reports, they may have found one in a ubiquitous weed.
Video

Video Scientists Unlock Mystery of Bird Flocks

How can flocks of birds, schools of fish or herds of antelope suddenly change direction -- all the individuals adjusting their movement in concert, at seemingly the same time? British researchers now have some insights into this behavior, which has puzzled scientists for a long time. VOA's George Putic has more.