UNITED STATES

FILE - Gay activists are seen at a rally at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., June 26, 2013.

Federal Government Recognizes Gay Marriages in Six More States

Married gay couples will now qualify for number of federal benefits in newly recognized states More

FILE - Dr. Felicity Hartnell, an Oxford University researcher, injects former nurse Ruth Atkins, a volunteer in an experimental Ebola vaccine program, in Oxford, England, Sept. 17, 2014.

Expert Says Ebola Vaccine Development Takes Time

Few firms will invest heavily in developing drug that benefits small number of people More

Secretary of State John Kerry (L), joined by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, speaks to media at the State Department in Washington, Oct. 24, 2014.

Kerry: US Open to Denuclearization Talks With North Korea

Secretary of State says before there could be any talks, US needs to be certain that communist nation is prepared to live up to its obligations More

A young girl reacts at a church where students were taken to be reunited with parents following a school shooting in Marysville, Washington, Oct. 24, 2014.

2 Dead, 4 Wounded in Washington State High School Shooting

Shooter, freshman described as popular youth, turns gun on self after killing fellow student More

FILE - A police officer stands in a row of police cars parked in Times Square in New York.

New York Hatchet Attack Called Act of Terrorism

Police commissioner says search of suspect's computers finds Islamic extremist websites More



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Comanche Chief Quanah Parker’s Century-Old House Falling Aparti
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Greg Flakus
October 25, 2014 1:47 AM
One of the most fascinating people in U.S. history was Quanah Parker, the last chief of the American Indian tribe, the Comanche. He was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Parker was a fierce warrior until 1875 when he led his people to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and took on a new, peaceful life. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Cache, Oklahoma, Quanah’s image remains strong among his people, but part of his heritage is in danger of disappearing.
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Video Comanche Chief Quanah Parker’s Century-Old House Falling Apart

One of the most fascinating people in U.S. history was Quanah Parker, the last chief of the American Indian tribe, the Comanche. He was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Parker was a fierce warrior until 1875 when he led his people to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and took on a new, peaceful life. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Cache, Oklahoma, Quanah’s image remains strong among his people, but part of his heritage is in danger of disappearing.
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Video Despite Gains, Obama Still Facing Ebola Criticism

The release of recovering Ebola patient Nina Pham from a Washington area hospital on Friday was a boost for the Obama administration, which has come under intense criticism for its handling of the Ebola cases that have so far appeared on U.S. soil. As VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports, that scrutiny continued Friday on Capitol Hill.
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Video Americans Anxious Over Ebola

A recent survey shows more than four in 10 Americans are worried they or a relative might catch the Ebola virus, even though so far there has only been three confirmed Ebola cases in the United States. VOA's Carolyn Presutti reports.
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Video One US Ebola Patient Cured, Another Stricken

A U.S. nurse who earlier this month contracted Ebola from a patient in Texas has been pronounced free of the disease, while at the same time, New York City authorities have announced the discovery of their first Ebola case. VOA's George Putic has more.
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Video Farmers Diversify Businesses to Attract Tourists

Fun on the farm is in full swing across the United States, as many farms host festivals and other activities to attract tourists. Whether visitors go to pick their own apples, take a wagon ride, or wander through a corn maze, they all want to have a unique experience. This trend, called agricultural tourism, has become a fast growing sector in the U.S.
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Video US Forms Rapid Response Teams for Ebola

The United States is forming medical teams that will rush to any part of the country where a new Ebola case is suspected. The Centers for Disease Control Ebola Response Teams, or CERTs for short, are made up of experts who are specially trained to diagnose and treat Ebola. Preparatory teams called Facility Assessment and Support Teams, or FASTs, will check hospitals that have volunteered to treat Ebola patients to make sure they can handle an Ebola case. Zlatica Hoke reports.
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Video US, S Korea Delay Transfer of Wartime Forces Control

The United States has agreed to an indefinite delay in handing over wartime control of troops on the Korean peninsula to South Korea. The US has held wartime authority over South Korean troops since the Korean War in the early 1950s. A transfer of authority had been scheduled for next year. VOA Pentagon correspondent Carla Babb has details.
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Video Baseball Championship Returns to Heart of the USA

Major League Baseball’s World Series is under way between the San Francisco Giants and the Kansas City Royals. While the Giants have won the baseball championship in recent years, it’s been almost three decades since the Royals made it this far. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, the return of baseball’s biggest game here to Kansas City has energized baseball fans in the heart of the United States, while also providing an economic boost to area attractions.
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Video American Detained in North Korea Returns Home

An American arrested and held for nearly six months in North Korea has returned home to the United States to hugs and tears of joy from his family. As VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports, analysts say it is still too early to tell whether the release is an effort by Pyongyang to improve relations with Washington.
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Video West Accused of Draining African Ebola-hit Countries of Doctors

Health systems in the West African countries worst hit by Ebola are struggling to contain the epidemic. A report from a British charity accuses Western countries of recruiting hundreds of doctors and nurses from Africa, severely weakening the frontline health services in the very countries where the disease has taken hold. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
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Video US Parties Face Challenge Motivating Hispanic Voters

U.S. citizens of Latin American descent, or Latinos, could play an important role in the midterm elections November 4, when Americans vote for members of the U.S. House of Representatives, a third of the Senate, and other state and local officials around the country. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports that in states like California, Latinos are a core constituency for Democrats, but both parties face a challenge in getting their vote.
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Video US Midterms: The Battle for the Senate

In the final days of the midterm campaign, Democrats and Republicans alike try to tap into what polls suggest is growing anxiety and apprehension
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Video US Candidates Tap into Fears to Mobilize Voters

Recent opinion surveys reflect an undercurrent of unease among American voters ahead of the November 4 congressional, state and local elections. A Gallup poll says the Ebola virus and the threat posed by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria are among the top 10 issues Americans consider the most important facing the country. VOA’s Cindy Saine reports from Capitol Hill on the “fear factor” in the 2014 elections.
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Video Iconic American Journalist Ben Bradlee Dies at 93

A giant of American journalism, former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, has died at age 93. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports that Bradlee played a critical role in the Post’s legal battle to publish secret U.S. documents about the Vietnam War, and oversaw the newspaper’s groundbreaking probe of the Watergate scandal that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon in 1974.
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Video New US Ebola Czar Aims to Improve Obama Image

As Ron Klain begins his job as President Barack Obama’s Ebola Czar on Wednesday, his agenda will include not only stopping the Ebola virus from spreading, but also containing the political damage that the three cases on U.S. soil have brought upon the president and his Democratic Party. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
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Video South African Dance Company Brings “Fusion” Work to New York

A festival of South African arts in New York, “Ubuntu,” features a dance company from Johannesburg. Vuyani Dance Theatre recently performed at New York City Center, where VOA’s Carolyn Weaver met up with them.
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Video Survivor's Blood Used in Ebola Treatment

There is no known cure for Ebola, but several U.S. patients have received donations of blood and plasma from a survivor of the Ebola virus. VOA's Katherine Gypson looks at whether the blood of Ebola survivors has value in the medical community.
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Video Healthcare Professionals Demand Better Preparedness for Ebola

Although there have only been three cases of Ebola diagnosed in the United States, unease about contracting the disease has spread across the country. At the same time, nurses are asking President Obama to mandate uniform procedures for dealing with Ebola in all U.S. hospitals, where they say preparations are, for the most part, far from adequate. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, public officials are supporting these requests.
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Video Network Sharing Improves Internet, Cell Phone Connections

During major emergencies, like the Boston Marathon bombing in 2010, cell phone and Wi-Fi networks quickly get overloaded. A group of scientists at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey, have designed and successfully tested a system that automatically uses all available networks, switching seamlessly from one to another, thus reducing the burden on all of them. VOA’s George Putic reports
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Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.

Health Care in Appalachia

VOA60 America

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VOA60 America - October 7, 2014i
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October 07, 2014 4:43 PM
The Supreme Court decided Monday to reject appeals against same-sex marriage in five states
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Video VOA60 America - October 7, 2014

The Supreme Court decided Monday to reject appeals against same-sex marriage in five states
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Video VOA60 America- October 3, 2014

The United States has partially lifted a decades-long embargo on lethal weapons for Vietnam
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Video VOA60 America - October 1, 2014

A man in Texas has been confirmed to be the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States
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Video VOA60 America- September 30, 2014

The head of the United States Secret Service Julia Pierson faces tough questioning before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee
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Video VOA60 America - September 29, 2014

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi gets a rock star reception at Madison Square Garden in New York City

More United States News

Video Farmers Diversify Businesses to Attract Tourists

Agricultural tourism is a fast growing sector of US economy
More

Kenya Pushes to Have Kenya Movies Shot on Location

For financial reasons, foreign producers are finding their iconic Kenyan landscapes elsewhere, notably South Africa
More

FARC Rebel Gets 27 Years in US Prison for Hostage-Taking

Alexander Beltran Herrera responsible for kidnapping three Americans whose plane crash-landed in Colombia
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US Probes Reports of IS Chlorine Gas Attacks

Kerry calls allegations serious but says they won't deter US-led coalition in fight against militants
More

Asian-Americans Assume Office in Record Numbers

Steadily deepening engagement in local politics pays off for politicians like Chinese-American Judy Chu
More

Multimedia US Nurse ‘Cured of Ebola,’ NIH Says

Nina Pham, Texas nurse who treated first Ebola patient in US, received no experimental drugs; WHO expects vaccine surge in 2015
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US Scales Back 'Cobra Gold' War Games in Thailand

US Embassy in Bangkok told VOA Friday Cobra Gold 2015 exercises set for February will be 'refocused and scaled down'
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New York Hatchet Attack Called Act of Terrorism

Police commissioner says search of suspect's computers finds Islamic extremist websites
More